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Old 03-04-2011   #31
Zanahoria_Picante
Orange you glad she's not a banana?
 
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Re: Logophiles Unite!

Quote:
Originally Said by ablethevoice View Post
Borborygmus (n)

Background:
From the Greek word meaning "to rumble." Borborygmus is onomatopoeic – because it sounds, at least to the Ancient Greeks, just like the thing it describes.


Simply put:
The noises your stomach makes when you're hungry
For the record, that's pronounced: bawr-buh-rig-muhs.

It seems that it's still pretty onomatopoeic (YES, first-try spelling succeed!) in English. That's magical.

And, Sketch, lovely choices! I actually don't recall those being posted before--they are "the good."

Now, try this on for size:

Dord
(n?)


1934, a ghost word printed in "Webster's New International Dictionary" and defined as a noun used by physicists and chemists, meaning "density." In sorting out and separating abbreviations from words in preparing the dictionary's second edition, a card marked "D or d" meaning "density" somehow migrated from the "abbreviations" stack to the "words" stack. The "D or d" entry ended up being typeset as a word, dord, and defined as a synonym for density. The mistake was discovered in 1939.
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